Learning
Indonesian

Why Study Indonesian?

The study of a language other than English contributes to the overall education of students, most particularly in the area of communication, but also in the areas of cross-cultural understanding, intercultural learning, cognitive development, literacy and general knowledge. It provides access to the culture of communities which use the language and promotes understanding of different attitudes and values within the wider Australian community and beyond. Indonesian language is becoming increasingly important as we enter the so called, ‘Asian Century’.

The ability to communicate in another language, particularly an Asian language, in conjunction with other skills, is always highly regarded by many prospective employers. It may provide opportunities for employment in a number of fields, ranging from trade, legal, communications, information technology, engineering and medical fields.

 The study of a language other than English contributes to the overall education of students, most particularly in the area of communication, but also in the areas of cross-cultural understanding, intercultural learning, cognitive development, literacy and general knowledge. It provides access to the culture of communities which use the language and promotes understanding of different attitudes and values within the wider Australian community and beyond. Indonesian language is becoming increasingly important as we enter the so called, ‘Asian Century’. The ability to communicate in another language, particularly an Asian language, in conjunction with other skills, is always highly regarded by many prospective employers. It may provide opportunities for employment in a number of fields, ranging from trade, legal, communications, information technology, engineering and medical fields.  

Structure

A VCE Indonesian study is made up of four units, each involving at least 50 hours of scheduled classroom instruction.

Each unit deals with specific content and is designed to enable students to achieve a set of outcomes. Each outcome is described in terms of key knowledge and skills.  

Outcomes
Outcomes define what students will know and be able to do as a result of undertaking the study.

Outcomes include a summary statement and the key knowledge and skills that underpin them. Only the summary statements have been reproduced below and must be read in conjunction with the key knowledge and skills published in the study design.

Unit 1  

Units 1-2 require four main assessment requirements (SAC) each semester. Units 3-4 require three major assessment requirements.       

Outcome 1
On completion of this unit the student should be able to establish and maintain a spoken or written exchange related to personal areas of experience.  

Outcome 2
On completion of this unit the student should be able to listen to, read and obtain information from spoken and written texts.  

Outcome 3
On completion of this unit the student should be able to produce a personal response to a text focusing on real or imaginary experience.

Unit 2  

Outcome 1
On completion of this unit the student should be able to participate in a spoken or written exchange related to making arrangements and completing transactions.  

Outcome 2
On completion of this unit the student should be able to listen to, read, and extract and use information and ideas from spoken and written texts.  

Outcome 3
On completion of this unit the student should be able to give expression to real or imaginary experience in spoken or written form. 

Unit 3  

Outcome 1  
On completion of this unit the student should be able to express ideas through the production of original texts.  

Outcome 2  
On completion of this unit the student should be able to analyse and use information from spoken texts. 

Outcome 3  
On completion of this unit the student should be able to exchange information, opinions and experiences.  

Unit 4

Outcome 1  
On completion of this unit the student should be able to analyse and use information from written texts.  

Outcome 2  
On completion of this unit the student should be able to respond critically to spoken and written texts which reflect aspects of the language and culture of Indonesian-speaking communities.  

Assessment

Satisfactory Completion
Demonstrated achievement of the set of outcomes specified for the unit.  

Levels of Achievement  

Units 1 and 2 
Emmaus College students complete graded Assessment Tasks and Semester Examinations as part of the Assessment process for Units 1 and 2.

Units 3 and 4
The Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority will supervise the assessment of all students undertaking Units 3 and 4.

School-assessed coursework and end-of-year examinations:

Unit 3 School-assessed Coursework 25%
Unit 4 School-assessed Coursework 25%
Examinations*: Oral Component 12.5%, Written Component 37.5%  
*A single grade is awarded